Carrie Underwood; Photo Courtesy Jeff Johnson
Carrie Underwood; Photo Courtesy Jeff Johnson

Carrie Underwood Fans Enraged She Was Not Included In GRAMMY Museum’s Women In Country Music Exhibit

Carrie Underwood fans are outraged after noticing that she is not included in the GRAMMY Museum’s just-announced The Power Of Women in Country Music exhibit.

On Thursday (April 21), The Recording Academy announced the new exhibit, which will highlight the past, present and future of country music’s greatest female trailblazers, according to a press release.

The Power Of Women in Country Music exhibit, which will launch on Friday, May 27 and run through Sunday, Oct. 2, will feature a variety of female country music superstars, from international superstars like Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift and Shania Twain to contemporary artists, such as Mickey Guyton and Carly Pearce.

When the news was announced via the GRAMMY Museum’s official Twitter account, many fans were quick to notice that Underwood, an eight-time GRAMMY winner, was not included on the list of featured artists.

While most Twitter users shared their excitement for the new exhibit, several pointed out the artists who were not included, leaving most asking “where is Carrie [Underwood]????”

“Umm…whoever curated this did a poor job with their “research”….. @carrieunderwood,” one user Tweeted.

Another responded to the GRAMMY Museum writing, “The fact that you left out the biggest star in country music is appalling. @carrieunderwood should have her own wing at this museum.”

One Underwood fan added, “With all due respect why isn’t @carrieunderwood part of this so called “power of women in country music” exhibit? I think it’s kind of disrespectful not to include her in such thing, Carrie is one of the biggest stars in country music and she deserves the recognition!“

Other fans expressed their upset with tweets that read, “How is it even possible @carrieunderwood is not included here? When I think of females in country music, I think of Carrie, first and foremost” and “Pretty embarrassing that the one woman consistently breaks barriers & records in Country Music isn’t mentioned in here? Why isn’t Carrie Underwood, the leading woman of Country Music, not in this?”

Others called the move “very strange and disrespectful to Carrie’s record-breaking career” and questioned The Recording Academy’s decision to not include the “Ghost Story” singer within the exhibit.

Another fan tweeted a reminder that Underwood has won eight GRAMMYs through the years, including New Artist & Female Country Vocal Performance (“Jesus, Take The Wheel”) in 2007, Female Country Vocal Performance (“Before He Cheats”) in 2008, Female Country Vocal Performance (“Last Name”) in 2009, Country Collaboration with Vocals (“I Told You So”) in 2010, Country Solo Performance (“Blown Away”) in 2013, Country Solo Performance (“Something In The Water”) in 2015, and her most recent win, Roots Gospel Album (‘My Savior’) in 2022.

Other deserving country music females not included on the list, as noted by fans on social media, include: The Chicks, Martina McBride, Alison Krauss, Tammy Wynette, Sara Evans, The Judds, Tanya Tucker and more.

According to a press release, The Power Of Women in Country Music will explore the rich history of women as a driving force in country music.

Artists featured in the exhibit include: Ingrid Andress, Kelsea Ballerini, Danielle Bradbery, Brandi Carlile, Maybelle and Sara Carter, Rosanne Cash, Callista Clark, Patsy Cline, Jessie Jo Dillon, Madeline Edwards, Nicolle Galyon, Mickey Guyton, Caylee Hammack, Emmylou Harris, The Highwomen, Faith Hill, Wanda Jackson, Jillian Jacqueline, Tiera Kennedy, Miranda Lambert, Loretta Lynn, Rose Maddox, Reba McEntire, Patsy Montana, Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, Rissi Palmer, Dolly Parton, Carly Pearce, Minnie Pearl, Pistol Annies, Margo Price, LeAnn Rimes, Jean Ritchie, Reyna Roberts, Allison Russell, Hillary Scott, Brittney Spencer, Taylor Swift, Leah Turner, Shania Twain, Laura Veltz, Cindy Walker, Tricia Walker, Trisha Yearwood, and Yola.

The exhibit will include memorabilia from notable moments of the featured women’s careers, including Dolly Parton’s dress from her 1971 Grand Ole Opry performance of “Joshua” and her custom butterfly-inlaid Gibson banjo, as well as Reba McEntire’s pink gown, worn in her 1993 music video for “Does He Love You,” and Faith Hill’s outfit from the 2017 Soul2Soul Tour, and her 2002 GRAMMY Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance.

It will also showcase iconic artifacts from Rosanne Cash, Wanda Jackson, Shania Twain, Taylor Swift, LeAnn Rimes and new, never-before-seen items from contemporary country artists such as Reyna Roberts, Brittney Spencer, Madeline Edwards, Callista Clark, and more.

“I am so inspired by the fearlessness, creativity and resilience of these artists. Each generation of women in country music has paved the way for the next, and now, they’re headlining festivals, winning GRAMMYs®, and breaking streaming records,” said Kelsey Goelz, GRAMMY Museum’s Associate Curator and curator of the exhibit.

Tickets for Museum members will go on sale beginning on Thursday, April 28 and for the general public on Saturday, April 30. Fans can purchase tickets for the exhibit HERE.

The GRAMMY Museum is located in Los Angeles, California.

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